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The Power of Positive Thinking- Dr Norman Vincent Peale -AUDIOBOOK CD New

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The Power of Positive Thinking- Dr Norman Vincent Peale -AUDIOBOOK CD New

The Power of Positive Thinking

by Dr Norman Vincent Peale

A useful guide to mastering the issues of everyday living

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The Power Of Positive Thinking - Dr Norman Vincent Peale - Audio Book CD

Brand New :  Abridged 1 Audio CD - 1 Hour

Translated into fifteen languages with over 7 million duplicates sold, The Power of Positive Thinking is unparalleled in its extraordinary ability for restoring the faltering belief of millions. In this insightful system, Dr. Peale provides the essence of his deep system for mastering the difficulties of everyday living. You may learn:

* How to eliminate that many devastating handicap -- self doubt
* How to free yourself from worry, strain and resentment
* How to climb above issues to visualize solutions and then achieve them
* Simple prayerful exercises to do daily, throughout the day, to reinforce your new-found habit of happiness

Eliminating all bad thoughts that prevent you from achieving joy and success, The Power of Positive Thinking is an inspiring system that will assist you create a positive change in your existence.

About the Author Dr Norman Vincent Peale

Dr Norman Vincent Peale was born in Bowersville, Ohio and died in Pawling, New York. He was educated at Ohio Wesleyan University and Boston University School of Theology. He graduated from Bellefontaine High School, Bellefontaine, OH.

Raised as a Methodist and initially ordained as a Methodist minister in 1922, Dr Norman Vincent Peale changed his religious affiliation to the Reformed Church in America in 1932 and started a 52-year tenure as pastor of Marble Collegiate Church in Manhattan. During that time the church's membership grew from 600 to over 5000, and he became 1 of New York City’s many well-known preachers. Dr Norman Vincent Peale and Smiley Blanton, a psychoanalyst, established a religio-psychiatric outpatient clinic upcoming door to the church. The 2 guys wrote books together, notably Faith Is the Answer: A Psychiatrist along with a Pastor Discuss Your Problems (1940). The book was created in alternating chapters, with Blanton composing 1 chapter, then Dr Norman Vincent Peale, etc. Blanton espoused no certain religious point of view in his chapters. In 1951 this clinic of psychotherapy and religion grew into the American Foundation of Religion and Psychiatry, with Dr Norman Vincent Peale serving as president and Blanton as executive director. Blanton handled difficult psychiatric situations and Dr Norman Vincent Peale, who had no mental wellness credentials, handled religious issues. (Meyer, Donald. The Positive Thinkers. Pantheon Books, 1965)

When Dr Norman Vincent Peale came under thick criticism within the mental wellness community for his controversial book "The Power of Positive Thinking," (1952) Blanton distanced himself from Dr Norman Vincent Peale and refused to endorse the book. Blanton refused to let Dr Norman Vincent Peale to employ his name in "The Power of Positive Thinking," refused to publicly endorse the book, and refused to publicly protect Dr Norman Vincent Peale when he came under criticism. As scholar Donald Meyer describes it: "Dr Norman Vincent Peale evidently imagined that he marched with Blanton in their joint labors in the Religio-psychiatric Institute. This wasn't precisely thus." (Meyer, Donald. Positive Thinkers. Pantheon Books, 1965, p.266). Meyer notes that Blanton's own book, "Love or Perish, (1956), "contrasted thus distinctly at a lot of points with all the Dr Norman Vincent Peale evangel," of "positive thinking" that these functions had almost nothing in well-known. (Ibid.,p.273)

Dr Norman Vincent Peale began a radio system, "The Art of Living," in 1935, which lasted for 54 years. Under sponsorship of the National Council of Churches he moved into tv when the modern medium arrived. In the meantime he had started to edit the magazine Guideposts and to write books. His sermons were mailed monthly. During the depression Dr Norman Vincent Peale teamed with James Cash Penney, founder of J.C. Penney & Co.; Arthur Godfrey, the radio and TV personality; and Thomas J. Watson, President and Founder of IBM to shape the initially board of 40Plus, an company that assists unemployed managers and professionals.

In 1945, Dr. Peale, his spouse, Ruth Stafford Peale, and Raymond Thornburg, a Pawling, New York businessman founded Guideposts magazine, a non-denominational forum for celebrities and average persons to relate inspirational stories. For its release, they raised ,200 from Frank Gannett, founder of the Gannett newspaper chain, J. Howard Pew, a Philadelphia industrialist and Branch Rickey, General Manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers.

Dr Norman Vincent Peale was a prolific writer; The Power of Positive Thinking is by far his many generally read function. First published in 1952, it stayed found on the New York Times bestseller list for 186 straight weeks, and based on the publisher, Simon and Schuster, the book has sold around 7 million duplicates. Some of his different favored functions include The Art of Living, A Guide to Confident Living, The Tough-Minded Optimist, and Inspiring Messages for Daily Living. In 1947 Dr Norman Vincent Peale co-founded (together with educator Kenneth Beebe) The Horatio Alger Association. This company aims to know and honor Americans who have been lucrative despite difficult circumstances they have faced.

In 1960 Dr Norman Vincent Peale, as spokesman for 150 Protestant clergymen, opposed the election of John F. Kennedy as president. "Faced with all the election of the Catholic," Dr Norman Vincent Peale announced, "our culture is at stake. (The Religious Issue: Hot and Getting Hotter. Newsweek. Sept 19, 1960.) In a created manifesto Dr Norman Vincent Peale and his group furthermore announced JFK would serve the interests of the Catholic church before the interests of the United States: "It is inconceivable that Roman Catholic president wouldn't be under extreme stress by the hierarchy of his church to accede to its policies with regard to foreign interests," and that the election of the Catholic may even end free speech in America.(The Religious Issue: Hot and Getting Hotter: Newsweek, Sept. 19, 1960. Buckley, William F. "We Hold These Truths." National Analysis. Jan. 28, 1961). Protestant theologian Reinhold Neibuhr responded "Dr. Peale and his associates... show blind prejudice." (The Religious Issue: Getting Hotter and Hotter: Newsweek. Sept 19, 1960). Protestant Episcopal Bishop James Pike echoed Neibuhr: "Any argument which would rule out a Roman Catholic simply because he is Roman Catholic is both bigotry along with a violation of the constitutional guarantee of no religious test for public workplace." ("The Power Of Negative Thinking." Time. Sept. 19, 1960). The Dr Norman Vincent Peale statement was further condemned by President Truman, the Board of Rabbis, and alternative leading Protestants like Paul Tillich and John C. Bennett. (Ibid.) Dr Norman Vincent Peale was forced to recant his statements and subsequently fired by his own committee. As conservative William F. Buckley succinctly described the fallout: "When... The Norman Vincent Peale Committee was organized, found on the system a vote for Kennedy was a vote to repeal the First Amendment to the Constitution, the Jesuits fired their Big Bertha, and Dr. Peale fled within the field, mortally wounded." (National Analysis. "We Hold These Truths." January 28, 1961). Dr Norman Vincent Peale subsequently went into hiding and threatened to resign from his church. (New York Times. "Beliefs." Oct. 31, 1992). The fallout continued as Dr Norman Vincent Peale was condemned in a statement by 1 100 religious leaders and dropped as a syndicated columnist by a dozen magazines. (Ibid). The uproar caused the pastor to back off from further formal partisan commitments, perhaps to avoid offending piece of the mass audience for his main religio-psychological content. He was, though, politically and personally close to President Nixon's family. In 1968 he officiated at the marriage of Julie Nixon and David Eisenhower. He continued calling at the White Home throughout the Watergate crisis, suggesting "Christ didn't shy away from individuals in trouble.

Dr Norman Vincent Peale is furthermore ideal remembered in politics by the distinguished Adlai Stevenson quote: "I find Paul appealing and Peale appalling." The origin of the quotation is traced to the 1952 election, when Stevenson was informed by a reporter that Dr Norman Vincent Peale had been attacking him as unfit for the presidency because he was divorced. (Former Senate prospect Ed Garvey in his blog fightingbob.com). Later during the 1956 campaign for President against Eisenhower, Stevenson was somewhat rudely introduced in the following way: "Gov. Stevenson, we like to create it obvious you're here as a courtesy because Dr. Norman Vincent Peale has instructed us to vote for your opponent." Stevenson stepped to the podium and quipped, "Speaking as a Christian, I find the Apostle Paul appealing and the Apostle Peale appalling." In 1960 Stevenson was asked by a reporter for a comment regarding Dr Norman Vincent Peale attacking JFK as unfit for the presidency because he was Catholic, to which Stevenson responded: "Yes, you are able to state that I find Paul appealing and Peale appalling." (Political commentator Tom Roeser tomroeser.com).

Stevenson continued to lampoon Dr Norman Vincent Peale found on the campaign trail in speeches for JFK. Though Nixon and the Republicans tried to distance themselves within the furor caused by Dr Norman Vincent Peale's anti-Catholic stance, Democrats didn't allow voters forget. President Truman, for 1, accused Nixon of tacit approval of the anti-Catholic sentiment, and it stayed a hot problem found on the campaign trail. (The Religious Issue: Hot and Getting Hotter: Newsweek. Sept. 19, 1960). Regarding Dr Norman Vincent Peale's intrusion into Republican politics, Stevenson mentioned in this transcript of the speech provided in San Francisco: "Richard Nixon has tried to step aside in favor of Norman Vincent Peale (APPLAUSE, LAUGHTER)... We will just surmise that Mr. Nixon has been reading 'The Power of Positive Thinking.' (APPLAUSE). America wasn't built by wishful thinking. It was built by realists, and it are not saved by guess function and self-deception. It may just saved by difficult function and facing the details." At a later date, according to 1 report, Stevenson and Peale met, and Stevenson apologized to Peale for any individual pain his comments would have caused Peale, though he not publicly recanted the substance of his statements. There is not any record of Peale apologizing to Stevenson for his attacks on Stevenson. It has been argued that even his "positive thinking" content was by implication politically conservative: "The underlying assumption of Peale's training was that most simple difficulties were individual." For his contributions to the field of theology, President Ronald Reagan granted Peale the Presidential Medal of Freedom (the highest civilian honor in the United States) on March 26, 1984. He died of stroke on December 24, 1993 at age 95.

The Power Of Positive Thinking - Dr Norman Vincent Peale - Audio Book CD


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