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Teach Yourself Gaelic Conversation - 3 Audio CDs and Booklet - Learn to speak Gaelic

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Teach Yourself Gaelic Conversation - 3 Audio CDs and Booklet - Learn to speak Gaelic

Speak Gaelic with Confidence

View alternative Gaelic Language Learning Audio click here

learn to speak gaelic conversation sound cd

Speak Gaelic with Confidence - 3 Audio CDs and Booklet   

Brand New (Booklet and 3 CDs):  

Perfect for complete novices or those who like to brush up found on the code, Teach Yourself Gaelic Conversation encourages you to speak out loud within the fairly begin. It qualities 10 topics such as 15 key words, 3 practical words, and 1 grammar point. Two test conversations bring those ingredients together properly. There are a lot of review chances, to gauge your progress and reinforce what you have learned. Additionally, the 3rd CD delivers invaluableguidance on carrying two-way conversations, addressing such issues as talking with folks who talk truly quickly or employ words and words you never understand.
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About the Authors


Boyd Robertson and Gordon Wells are experienced teachers and programmers of Gaelic code understanding contents.

Table of Contents:


CD1Introduction; Meeting and Greeting; Getting Around; Basic Requests; Shopping; Sightseeing

CD2At the Restaurant; Describing People; At the Beach; What's the Matter?; Taking Your Leave

CD3Review of all above.

About the Gaelic Language


Gaelic is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. This branch furthermore involves the Irish and Manx languages. It is distinct within the Brythonic branch of the Celtic languages, including Welsh, Cornish, and Breton. Scottish, Manx and Irish Gaelic are all descended from Old Irish. The code is usually described as Scottish Gaelic, Scots Gaelic, or Gàidhlig to avoid confusion with all the different 2 Goidelic languages. Outside Scotland, it's sometimes also known as Scottish, a use dating back over 1,500 years; for illustration Old English Scottas. Scottish Gaelic ought not to be confused with Scots, because since the 16th century the term Scots has by-and-large been chosen to describe the Lowland Anglic code, which developed within the northern shape of early Middle English. Old Gaelic, the precursor to both Modern Irish and Scottish Gaelic, was created in a carved composing called Ogham. Ogham consisted of marks produced above or below a horizontal line. With the advent of Christianity in the 5th century the Latin alphabet was introduced to Ireland. The Goidelic languages have historically been piece of the dialect continuum stretching within the south of Ireland, the Isle of Man, to the north of Scotland.

Classical Gaelic was employed as a literary code in Ireland until the 17th century and in Scotland until the 18th century. Later orthographic divergence is the outcome of more recent orthographic reforms causing standardised pluricentric diasystems.

The 1767 New Testament historically set the standard for Scottish Gaelic. Around the time of World War II, Irish spelling was reformed and the Official Standard or Caighdeán Oifigiúil introduced. Further reform in 1957 eliminated a few of the quiet letters that are nonetheless employed in Scottish Gaelic. The 1981 Scottish Examinations Board recommendations for Scottish Gaelic, the Gaelic Orthographic Conventions, were adopted by many publishers and agencies, although they stay controversial among some academics, many notably Ronald Black.

The contemporary Scottish Gaelic alphabet has 18 letters:

A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, L, M, N, O, P, R, S, T, U.

The letter h, today largely utilized to indicate lenition of the consonant, was as a whole not utilized in the oldest orthography, as lenition was rather indicated with a dot over the lenited consonant. The letters of the alphabet were traditionally called after trees (see Scottish Gaelic alphabet), but this custom has fallen from employ.

The standard of consonants is indicated in composing by the vowels surrounding them. So-called "slender" consonants are palatalised while "broad" consonants are velarised. The vowels e and i are classified as slim, along with a, o, and u as wide. The spelling direction recognised as caol ri caol agus leathann ri leathann ("slender to slim and wide to broad") needs a word-medial consonant or consonant group followed by a created i or e be additionally preceded by an i or e; and similarly if followed by a, o or u be moreover preceded by an a, o, or u. Consonant standard (palatalised or non-palatalised) is then indicated by the vowels created adjacent to a consonant, and the spelling direction provides the advantage of removing possible uncertainty about consonant standard at the cost of adding extra strictly graphical vowels that might not be pronounced.

In changes promoted by the Scottish Examination Board from 1976 onwards, certain modifications were created for this direction. As an example, the suffix of the previous participle is constantly spelled -te, even after a wide consonant, as in togte "raised" (instead of the conventional togta). Where pairs of vowels happen in writing, it is actually occasionally unclear which vowel is to be pronounced and which vowel has been introduced to meet this spelling direction. Unstressed vowels omitted in speech is omitted in casual writing. For example:

Tha mi an dòchas. ("I hope.") > Tha mi 'n dòchas.

Once Gaelic orthographic rules have been learned, the pronunciation of the created code is enjoyed to be very predictable. But learners need to be thoughtful to not try to apply English sound-to-letter correspondences to created Gaelic, otherwise mispronunciations may result. Gaelic individual names like Seònaid are incredibly probably to be mispronounced by English speakers. English orthographic rules have equally been employed at different instances in Gaelic writing. Notable examples of Gaelic verse composed in this way are the Book of the Dean of Lismore and the Fernaig manuscript.

Speak Gaelic with Confidence - 3 Audio CDs and Booklet


You can pay for an mp3 audio book on-line from the House of Oojah from our range of Talking Books that we carry in store for transportation over NZ. You can play your CD Audio Book on a CD player or switch it to mp3 medium and run it on a ipod (or similar). There is information and facts on how to do this on this page

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