Home the house of oojah new zealand

Login to enhance your shopping experience.

Login or Create an Account
Categories
Information
Online Store Menu
Quick Store Search

Advanced Search
Shopping Cart

There are no items in your shopping cart.

Teach Yourself Old English - 2 Audio CDs and Book

add to cart

Teach Yourself Old English - 2 Audio CDs and Book

 Teach Yourself Complete Old English

Book and 2 Audio CDs

darkest worry harlan coben sound book cd

Teach Yourself Complete Old English- 2 Audio CDs and Book 

Brand New: 2 Cds and Book   

A book and CD Pack, 'Teach Yourself Old English' is a self-access course for the independent adult learner who wants to discover to read Old English texts in the authentic. Texts of literary and famous interest are utilized to introduce the code, that is then explained in easy contemporary English, as it is actually not assumed that the student has learned a foreign code before. Exercises - created, sound, and pictorial - are utilized to reinforce understanding. Short 'cultural context' products bring the culture of medieval England to existence, and explain the relevance of Old English code and literature to speakers of contemporary English. Selected extracts in Old English feature found on the sound CDs.

* GRAMMAR IS CLEARLY EXPLAINED - in easy contemporary English
* CULTURE SECTIONS - recognize the relevance of Old English to contemporary English code, literature and life
* OLD ENGLISH TAUGHT THROUGH AUTHENTIC TEXTS - the words and words as selected in the authentic documents
* EXERCISES TO REINFORCE UNDERSTANDING - comprehension, reading for gist, comparing texts
* LISTEN TO OLD ENGLISH ON THE AUDIO CD - bring Old English to life

Table of Contents:
Contents
Part I - Foundation
1 A king should rule a country
2 Say what I am called
3 I promise 3 things
4 The 4 season
5 A certain stone
6 Signs in the monastery
7 King Cnut's proclamation
8 Charters and writs
9 Dedication of the church
10 The translation of St Alphege
11 The family dispute in Herefordshire
12 Love and marriage
13 The king's duties
14 The initially English fiction
Part II - History
15 The Alfred jewel
16 Alfred and Guthrum
17 The Fonthill cattle raid
18 The legend of the Anchorite
19 Three charters within the reign of Edgar
20 Bishop Æthelwold of Winchester
21 Abbot Ælfric
22 Byrhtferth and Wulfstan
Part III - Poetry
23 Runes
24 The Wanderer
25 The Seafarer
26 The Beowulf manuscript
27 Beowulf
28 Beowulf and archaeology
CD: Readings
1 Here Edward was consecrated as king
2 A king should rule a kingdom
3 Say what I am called
4 Here in this year
5 About the 4 seasons
6 I saw in a dream
7 King Cnut greets his archbishops
8 He guaranteed her the land at Orleton
9 I find my brothers, where they are keeping their herds
10 These are the bounds of the pasture at Hazelhurst
11 Here is announced in this document
12 I saw a creature travel found on the wave
13 And they place him into the waterless well
14 The boy is not here
15 I constantly desired to convert to the monastic life
16 It occurred 1 night
17 And bishop Aethelnoth travelled to Rome
18 Archbishop Wulfstan greets king Cnut
19 How Wynflaed summoned her witnesses
20 Act like thegns, and deliver my content to the assembly

About the Author:

Dr Mark Atherton is Lecturer in English Language and Literature at Regent’s Park College, Oxford University. A trained instructor, he has taught in Germany and Austria and has published generally in medieval research and linguistics.

About Old English Language

Old English (also known as Anglo-Saxon, Englisc by its speakers) is an early shape of the English code that has been spoken and created in components of what are today England and southern Scotland between your mid-5th century and the mid-12th century. What survives through composing represents mainly the literary register of Anglo-Saxon. It is a West Germanic code and is carefully associated to Old Frisian. It equally experienced thick influence from Old Norse, a member of the connected North Germanic group of languages. Old English wasn't static, as well as its use covered a period of around 700 years (see Timeline of the Anglo-Saxon invasion and takeover of Britain) – within the Anglo-Saxon migrations that created England in the fifth century to some time after the Norman invasion of 1066, when the code underwent a dramatic transition. During this early period it assimilated some aspects of the languages with which it came in contact, like the Celtic languages and the 2 dialects of Old Norse within the invading Vikings, who were occupying and controlling big tracts of land in northern and eastern England, which came to be well-known as the Danelaw. The most crucial force in shaping Old English was its Germanic history in its vocabulary, sentence structure and grammar which it shared with its sister languages in continental Europe. Some of these qualities were particular to the West Germanic code family to which Old English belongs, while other attributes were inherited within the Proto-Germanic code from which all Germanic languages are believed to have been derived. Like alternative West Germanic languages of the period, Old English was completely inflected with five grammatical situations (nominative, accusative, genitive, dative, and instrumental, though the instrumental was quite rare), which had double plural types for referring to groups of 2 objects (but just in the individual pronouns) in addition to the normal singular and plural types. It moreover assigned gender to all nouns, including those that describe inanimate objects: for illustration, sēo sunne (the Sun) was feminine, while se mōna (the Moon) was masculine .

A big percentage of the educated and literate population (monks, clerics, etc.) were competent in Latin, which was the scholarly and diplomatic lingua franca of Europe at the time. It is often possible to provide approximate dates for the entry of individual Latin words into Old English based on which patterns of linguistic change they have undergone. There were at least 3 notable periods of Latin influence. The initial happened before the ancestral Saxons left continental Europe for Britain. The 2nd started when the Anglo-Saxons were converted to Christianity and Latin-speaking priests became common. The 3rd and biggest single transfer of Latin-based words occurred after the Norman invasion of 1066, after which a massive amount of Norman words entered the code. These Oïl code words were themselves derived from Old French and eventually from classical Latin, although a notable stock of Norse words were introduced, or re-introduced in Norman shape. The Norman Conquest around marks the finish of Old English and the advent of Middle English.

One of the techniques the influence of Latin is enjoyed is the fact that countless Latin words for escapades came to additionally be employed to refer to the individuals involved in those escapades, an idiom carried over from Anglo-Saxon but utilizing Latin words. This is enjoyed in words like militia, assembly, movement, and service.

The code was further changed by the transition away within the runic alphabet to the Latin alphabet, which was furthermore a extensive element in the developmental pressures brought to bear found on the code. Old English words were spelt as they were pronounced; the "silent" letters in several Modern English words, including the k in knight, were not surprisingly pronounced in Old English. As an example, the c in cniht, the Old English ancestor of the contemporary knight, was pronounced. Another side-effect of spelling words phonetically was that spelling was very variable – the spelling of the word would reflect variations in the phonetics of the writer's territorial dialect, and idiosyncratic spelling options which varied from writer to writer, and even from function to function by the same writer. Thus, for illustration, the term and can be spelt either and or ond. Old English spelling could consequently be considered more jumbled than contemporary English spelling, although it could at least claim to reflect some existing pronunciation, while contemporary English in several instances cannot. Most present-day pupils of Old English discover the code utilizing normalised versions and are just introduced to variant spellings after they have mastered the fundamentals of the code.

The 2nd main source of loanwords to Old English were the Scandinavian words introduced during the Viking invasions of the 9th and 10th decades. Additionally to a desirable various region names, these comprise mostly of products of standard vocabulary, and words worried with certain administrative aspects of the Danelaw . The Vikings talked Old Norse, a code associated to Old English in that both derived within the same ancestral Proto-Germanic code. It is especially widespread for the intermixing of speakers of different dialects, including those that happen during occasions of political unrest, to cause a mixed code, and 1 theory holds that precisely such a mixture of Old Norse and Old English helped accelerate the decline of case endings in Old English. Apparent verification of the is that simplification of the case endings happened earliest in the North and newest in the Southwest, the region farthest away from Viking influence. Regardless of the truth of the theory, the influence of Old Norse found on the English code has been profound: responsible for such standard vocabulary products as sky, leg, the pronoun they, the verb shape are, and hundreds of alternative words. Traditionally, several keep that the influence of Celtic on English has been tiny, citing the little amount of Celtic loanwords taken into the code. The amount of Celtic loanwords is of the lower purchase than either Latin or Scandinavian; distinctive Celtic traits have been argued to be clearly discernible within the post-Old English period in the region of syntax.

Old English cannot be considered single monolithic entity simply as Modern English is additionally not monolithic. Within Old English there was code variation. So, it is very misleading, for illustration, to consider Old English as having a single sound program. Rather, there were several Old English sound systems. Old English has variation along territorial lines and variation across different time periods. For instance, the code attested in West Saxon during the time of Æthelwold of Winchester, that is called Early West Saxon (or Æthelwoldian Saxon), is considerably different within the code attested in West Saxon during the time of Alfred the Great's court, that is called Late West Saxon (or Classical West Saxon or Alfredian Saxon). Additionally, the difference between Early West Saxon and Late West Saxon is of such a nature that Late West Saxon is not straight descended from Early West Saxon (despite what the similarity in name implies).

The 4 key dialectal types of Old English were Mercian, Northumbrian (recognized collectively as Anglian), Kentish, and West Saxon. Each of those dialects was associated with an independent kingdom found on the island. Of these, all of Northumbria and nearly all of Mercia were overrun by the Vikings during the 9th century. The part of Mercia and all of Kent which were effectively defended were then integrated into Wessex. After the task of unification of the diverse Anglo-Saxon kingdoms in 878 by Alfred the Great, there is a marked decline in the value of territorial dialects. This really is not because they stopped existing; territorial dialects continued even after that time to the day, as evidenced both by the existence of center and contemporary English dialects later, and by good sense – individuals never spontaneously develop fresh accents when there is a abrupt change of political energy. However, the bulk of the surviving documents within the Anglo-Saxon period are created in the dialect of Wessex, Alfred's kingdom. It appears probably that with consolidation of force, it became essential to standardise the code of government to minimize the difficulty of administering the more remote regions of the kingdom. As a outcome, paperwork was created in the West Saxon dialect. Not just this, but Alfred was passionate about the spread of the vernacular and brought several scribes to his area from Mercia so that earlier unwritten texts be recorded.

The Church was affected alike, specifically since Alfred initiated an ambitious programme to translate religious components into English. In purchase to retain his patronage and confirm the widest circulation of the translated contents, the monks and priests involved in the programme worked in his dialect. Alfred himself appears to have translated books from Latin and into English, notably Pope Gregory I's treatise on management, "Pastoral Care". Because of the centralisation of energy and the Viking invasions, there is small or no created evidence for the development of non-Wessex dialects after Alfred's unification. Modern-day Received Pronunciation is not a direct descendant of the number one attested dialect, Late West Saxon. It is somewhat a descendent of the Mercian dialect — either East Mercian or South-East Mercian. So, Late West Saxon had small influence found on the development of Modern English and the developments occurring in its antecedent, Middle English.

Teach Yourself Complete Old English- 2 Audio CDs and Book 


You can purchase an Audio Talking Book on the web using the House of Oojah from our range of audio talking books that we carry in store for shipping throughout NZ. You can play your CD Audio Book on a portable CD player or transfer it to mp3 format and run it on a smart phone (or similar). There is strategies on how to do this here

Regularly:

NZ$ 143.95

On Sale:

NZ$ 129.95

In stock

 

All required fields are marked with a star (*). Click the 'Add To Cart' button at the bottom of this form to proceed.

Item Quantity

Enter the appropriate quantity for this item below.

Related Items
Pimsleur Basic Thai Language 5 AUDIO CD -Discount - Learn to speak Thai

Pimsleur Basic Thai Language 5 AUDIO CD -Discount - Learn to speak Thai

The Pimsleur approach -Audio only

Regularly:

NZ$ 90.95

On Sale:

NZ$ 51.95

This item is currently out of stock

Pimsleur Basic Russian - Audio Book 5 CD -Discount- Learn to Speak Russian

Pimsleur Basic Russian - Audio Book 5 CD -Discount- Learn to Speak Russian

HEAR IT, LEARN IT, SPEAK IT

Regularly:

NZ$ 90.95

On Sale:

NZ$ 51.95

In stock

Teach Yourself Indonesian 2 Audio CDs and Book - Learn to speak Indonesian

Teach Yourself Indonesian 2 Audio CDs and Book - Learn to speak Indonesian

progress quickly from the basics to understanding

Price:

NZ$ 122.95

This item is currently out of stock

Bertlitz Vietnamese Travel Pack Audio CD and Phrase Book

Bertlitz Vietnamese Travel Pack Audio CD and Phrase Book

1200 words and phrases

This item is currently out of stock

Teach Yourself Complete Russian Book and 2 CDs

Teach Yourself Complete Russian Book and 2 CDs

equip the complete beginner with the skills needed to communicate in practical, everyday situations

Regularly:

NZ$ 143.95

On Sale:

NZ$ 129.95

In stock

Pimsleur Basic Spanish - Audio Book 5 CD -Discount-Learn to speak Spanish

Pimsleur Basic Spanish - Audio Book 5 CD -Discount-Learn to speak Spanish

HEAR IT, LEARN IT, SPEAK IT

Regularly:

NZ$ 90.95

On Sale:

NZ$ 51.95

This item is currently out of stock

Account Menu
Recently Visited Pages
Popular Pages