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Teach Yourself Turkish Book and 2 Audio CDs - Learn to Speak Turkish

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Teach Yourself Turkish Book and 2 Audio CDs - Learn to Speak Turkish

Teach Yourself Turkish

2 Audio CDs and Book

Get different Turkish Audio Language Learning - click here

audio books

Teach Yourself Turkish - 2 Audio CDs Book

Goal
*all-round self-confidence category

Content
*learn how to speak, know and write turkish
*progress promptly beyond the basics
*explore the code in depth

Teach Yourself Turkish is a complete course for newbies in created and spoken Turkish. It is additionally perfect for those wanting to brush up existing knowledge of the code and those that are studying with a instructor and are seeking supplementary information.

There are 16 carefully graded and interlocking units. Each device introduces fresh code structures firmly embedded in a functional context, meaning you focus found on the uses to which you are able to place the code in everyday cases.

There is additionally comprehensive aid with all the pronunciation both in the Introduction and found on the accompanying 2 x 60-minute CD

About the Authors


Asuman Celen Pollard, co-author, was born in Turkey where she invested years training both English and Turkish as a foreign code. She today teaches Turkish at the University of Birmingham.

After training English as a Foreign Language in Switzerland, Bulgaria and Turkey, David Pollard, co-author, became a computer analyst-programmer and invested a decade developing educational software. He today functions in healthcare knowledge.

About the Turkish Language

Turkish is a code spoken by 65–73 million individuals internationally, creating it the many commonly spoken of the Turkic languages. Its speakers are situated predominantly in Turkey, with small communities in Cyprus, Bulgaria, Greece, and Eastern Europe. Turkish is additionally spoken by many million immigrants in Western Europe, especially in Germany.

The origins of the code is traced to Central Asia, with all the initially created records dating back almost 1,200 years. To the west, the influence of Ottoman Turkish—the immediate precursor of today's Turkish—spread as the Ottoman Empire expanded. In 1928, as 1 of Atatürk's Reforms in the early years of the new Turkish Republic, the Ottoman script was changed with a phonetic variant of the Latin alphabet. Concurrently, the newly founded Turkish Language Association initiated a drive to reform the code by removing Persian and Arabic loanwords in favor of native variants and coinages from Turkic origins.

The distinctive characteristics of Turkish are vowel harmony and extensive agglutination. The standard word purchase of Turkish is Subject Object Verb. Turkish has a T-V distinction: second-person plural types is chosen for people as a signal of regard. Turkish also offers no noun classes or grammatical gender.

Turkic languages and Altaic languages

Turkish is a member of the Turkish, or Western, subgroup of the Oghuz languages, including Gagauz and Azeri. The Oghuz languages shape the Southwestern subgroup of the Turkic languages, a code family comprising some 30 living languages spoken across Eastern Europe, Central Asia. and Siberia. Some linguists believe the Turkic languages to be a piece of the greater Altaic code family. About 40% of Turkic code speakers are Turkish speakers. The characteristic qualities of Turkish, including vowel harmony, agglutination, and deficiency of grammatical gender, are universal in the Turkic family and the Altaic languages.There is a excellent degree of mutual intelligibility between Turkish and the different Oghuz languages, including Azeri, Turkmen, Qashqai, and Gagauz.

History

The earliest acknowledged Turkic inscriptions live in contemporary Mongolia. The Bugut inscriptions created in the Sogdian alphabet during the First Göktürk Khanate are dated to the 2nd half of the 6th century. The 2 monumental Orkhon inscriptions, erected in honour of the prince Kul Tigin and his brother Emperor Bilge Khan and dating back to some time between 732 and 735, constitute another significant early record. After the discovery and excavation of these monuments and associated stone slabs by Russian archaeologists in the wider region surrounding the Orkhon Valley between 1889–93, it became established that the code found on the inscriptions was the Old Turkic code created utilizing the Orkhon script, that has additionally been called "Turkic runes" or "runiform" due to an exterior similarity to the Germanic runic alphabets.

With the Turkic expansion during Early Middle Ages (c. 6th–11th centuries), peoples talking Turkic languages spread across Central Asia, covering a wide geographical area stretching from Siberia to Europe and the Mediterranean. The Seljuqs of the Oghuz Turks, in specific, brought their code, Oghuz Turkic—the direct ancestor of today's Turkish language—into Anatolia during the 11th century. Additionally during the 11th century, an early linguist of the Turkic languages, Kaşgarlı Mahmud within the Kara-Khanid Khanate, published the initially comprehensive Turkic code dictionary and map of the geographical distribution of Turkic speakers in the Compendium of the Turkic Dialects (Ottoman Turkish: Divânü Lügati't-Türk).

Ottoman Turkish

Following the adoption of Islam c. 950 by the Kara-Khanid Khanate and the Seljuq Turks, that are considered the cultural ancestors of the Ottomans, the administrative code of these states acquired a big collection of loanwords from Arabic and Persian. Turkish literature during the Ottoman period, very Ottoman Divan poetry, was heavily influenced by Persian, including the adoption of poetic meters along with a fantastic number of borrowings. The literary and official code during the Ottoman Empire (c. 1299–1922) was a mixture of Turkish, Persian, and Arabic that differed considerably within the period's everyday spoken Turkish, and is termed Ottoman Turkish.

Language reform and contemporary Turkish

After the foundation of the Republic of Turkey and the script reform, the Turkish Language Association (TDK) was established in 1932 under the patronage of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, with all the aim of performing analysis on Turkish. One of the jobs of the newly-established organization was to initiate a code reform to substitute loanwords of Arabic and Persian origin with Turkish equivalents. By banning the use of loanwords in the hit, the organization succeeded in removing many 100 foreign words within the code. While nearly all of the words introduced to the code by the TDK were newly derived from Turkic origins, it additionally opted for reviving Old Turkish words which had not been selected for decades.

Due for this abrupt change in the code, elder and young persons in Turkey began to vary in their vocabularies. While the decades born before the 1940s tend to employ the elder terms of Arabic or Persian origin, the young decades prefer modern expressions. It is very ironic that Atatürk himself, in his monumental speech to the brand-new Parliament in 1927, utilized a fashion of Ottoman diction which now sounds thus alien that it has had to be "translated" 3 instances into contemporary Turkish: initially in 1963, again in 1986, and many newly in 1995. There is equally a political dimension to the code debate, with conservative groups tending to employ more archaic words in the hit or everyday code.

The previous limited years have enjoyed the continuing function of the TDK to coin unique Turkish words to express hot concepts and technologies as they enter the code, largely from English. Many of these unique words, especially info development terms, have received popular acceptance. But, the TDK is sometimes criticized for coining words which sound contrived and artificial. Some earlier changes—such as bölem to substitute fırka, "political party"—also failed to satisfy with common approval (in actual fact, fırka has been changed by the French loanword parti). Some words restored from Old Turkic have taken on specialized meanings; for illustration betik (initially meaning "book") is today utilized to indicate "script" in computer research.

Many of the words derived by TDK coexist with their elder counterparts. This normally arises when a loanword changes its authentic meaning. For example, dert, derived within the Persian dard (درد "pain"), signifies "problem" or "trouble" in Turkish; whereas the native Turkish word ağrı is chosen for bodily pain. Occasionally the loanword has a somewhat different meaning within the native Turkish word, offering rise to a condition synonymous to the coexistence of Germanic and Romance words in English (see List of Germanic and Latinate equivalents). Among a few of the aged words that have been changed are terms in geometry, cardinal directions, some months' names, and various nouns and adjectives.

Teach Yourself Turkish - 2 Audio CDs and Book


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