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The Comedy of Errors - by William Shakespeare - Dramatised Play Audio CD Unabridged

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The Comedy of Errors - by William Shakespeare - Dramatised Play Audio CD Unabridged

The Comedy of Errors

by William Shakespeare

A totally dramatised recording

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The Comedy of Errors by William Shakespeare - Unabridged Play on Audio CD

Brand New :  Unabridged 2 Audio CDs 88 minutes


Egeon faces performance, unless he may pay a fine of the thousand marks. He informs his sad story. In his youth, he wedded and had twin sons. On the same day, a bad girl furthermore gave birth to twin guys, and he bought these as slaves to his sons. Soon afterwards, the family produced a sea voyage, and was hit by a tempest. Egeon lashed himself to the main-mast with 1 son and 1 slave, while his spouse was rescued by 1 boat, Egeon by another. Egeon not again saw his spouse, or the kids with her. Recently, his son Antipholus of Syracuse, today grown, and his son’s slave Dromio of Syracuse, left Syracuse on a quest to obtain their brothers. When Antipholus of Syracuse didn't return, Egeon set out looking for him. Solinus, Duke of Ephesus, is moved by this story, and grants Egeon 1 day to pay his fine. That same day, Antipholus of Syracuse arrives in Ephesus, looking for his brother. He sends Dromio of Syracuse to deposit some cash at The Centaur (an inn). He is confounded when the identical Dromio of Ephesus appears virtually instantly, denying any knowledge of the cash and asking him house to dinner, where his spouse is waiting. Antipholus, thinking his servant is creating insubordinate jokes, beats Dromio.

Dromio of Ephesus returns to his mistress, Adriana, suggesting that her "husband" refused to come house, and even pretended to not recognize her. Adriana, worried that her husband's eye is straying, takes this news as verification of her suspicions. Antipholus of Syracuse, who complains "I couldn't talk to Dromio since at initial I transferred him within the mart," meets up with Dromio who today denies creating a "joke" about Antipholus having a spouse. Antipholus starts beating him again. Suddenly, Adriana rushes as much as Antipholus and begs him to not leave her. The Syracusans cannot but attribute these unusual occasions to witchcraft, remarking that Ephesus is well-known as a warren for witches. Antipholus and Dromio go off with this unusual girl, to consume dinner and keep the gate, respectively. Antipholus of Ephesus returns house for dinner and is enraged to obtain that he is rudely refused entry to his own home by Dromio of Syracuse, who is keeping the gate. He is prepared to break down the door, but his neighbors persuade him to not create a scene. He chooses, rather, to dine with a Courtesan. Inside the home, Antipholus of Syracuse discovers that he is extremely attracted to his wife's sister, Luciana, telling her "train me not, sweet mermaid, with thy note / To drown me in thy sister's flood of tears." She is flattered by his attentions, but worried about their moral implications. After she exits, Dromio of Syracuse announces that he has noticed that he has a wife: Nell, a hideous kitchen-maid. He describes her as "spherical, like a globe; I may discover out nations in her...buttocks: I found it out by the bogs." He claims he has noticed America and the Indies "upon her nose all o'er embellished with rubies, carbuncles, sapphires, declining their wealthy aspect to the hot breathing of Spain; who transferred entire armadoes of caracks to be ballast at her nose." This really is 1 of Shakespeare's limited references to America. The Syracusans choose to leave because shortly because possible, and Dromio runs off to create travel plans. Antipholus is apprehended by Angelo, a goldsmith, who claims that he ordered a chain from him. Antipholus is forced to accept the chain, and Angelo states that he usually return for payment.

Antipholus of Ephesus dispatches Dromio to buy a rope thus that he will beat his spouse Adriana for locking him out, then is accosted by Angelo, who informs him "I thought to have ta'en you at the Porpentine" and asks to be reimbursed for the chain. He denies ever seeing it, and is promptly arrested. Antipholus dispatches Dromio back to Adriana's apartment to receive funds for his bail. After completing this errand, Dromio of Syracuse mistakenly provides the funds to Antipholus of Syracuse. The Courtesan spies Antipholus wearing the gold chain, and states he guaranteed it to her. The Syracusans deny this, and flee. The Courtesan resolves to tell Adriana that her spouse is crazy. Dromio of Ephesus returns to the arrested Antipholus of Ephesus, with all the rope. Antipholus is infuriated. Adriana, Luciana and the Courtesan enter with a conjurer called Pinch, who attempts to exorcise the Ephesians, that are bound and taken to Adriana's home. The Syracusans enter, carrying swords, and everybody runs off for fear: believing that they are the Ephesians, out for vengeance after somehow escaping their bonds. Adriana reappears with henchmen, who attempt to bind the Syracusans. They take sanctuary in a nearby priory, where the Abbess resolutely protects them. The Duke and Egeon enter, on their method to Egeon's performance. Adriana begs the Duke to force the Abbess to release her spouse. Next, a messenger from Adriana's apartment runs in and announces that the Ephesians have broken loose from their bonds and tortured Doctor Pinch. The Ephesians enter and ask the Duke for justice against Adriana. Egeon believes he has found his own son, Antipholus, who can bail him, but both Ephesians deny having ever watched him before.

Suddenly, the Abbess enters with all the Syracusan twins, and everyone starts to know the confused occasions of the day. Not just are the 2 sets of twins reunited, but the Abbess reveals that she is Egeon's spouse, Emilia. The Duke pardons Egeon. All exit into the abbey to enjoy the reunification of the family.

The Comedy of Errors is regarded as William Shakespeare's earliest plays, believed to have been created between 1592 and 1594. It is his shortest and 1 of his many farcical, with a main piece of the humour from slapstick and mistaken identity, in addition to puns and wordplay. The Comedy of Errors (together with The Tempest) is regarded as just 2 of Shakespeare's plays to observe the classical unities. It has been adapted for opera, stage, screen and musical theatre.

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About the Author William Shakespeare

(baptised April 26 1564 - died April 23 1616)
William Shakespeare (moreover spelled Shakspere, Shaksper, Shaxper, and Shake-speare, because that spelling in Elizabethan occasions was not fixed and absolute[8]) was born in Stratford-upon-Avon in April 1564, the son of John Shakespeare, a lucrative glover and alderman from Snitterfield, and of Mary Arden, a daughter of the gentry. His birth is assumed to have happened at the family apartment on Henley Street. Shakespeare's christening record dates to April 26 of that year. Because christenings were done within a limited days of birth, custom has settled on April 23 as his birthday. This date delivers a advantageous symmetry because Shakespeare died found on the same day, April 23 (May 3 found on the Gregorian calendar), in 1616.

Shakespeare possibly attended King Edward VI Grammar School in central Stratford. While the standard of Elizabethan-era grammar universities was uneven, the school possibly would have provided an intense knowledge in Latin grammar and literature. It is presumed that the young Shakespeare attended this school, since because the son of the prominent town official he was entitled to do thus for free (although his attendance cannot be confirmed because the school's records have not survived). At the age of eighteen, he married Anne Hathaway, who was twenty-six, on November 28, 1582. One document identified her as being "of Temple Grafton," near Stratford, and the wedding could have happened there. Two neighbours of Anne posted bond that there were no impediments to the wedding. There appears to have been some haste in arranging the ceremony, presumably because Anne was 3 months expecting.

After his wedding, Shakespeare left limited traces in the historic record until he appeared found on the London theatrical scene. Indeed, the late 1580s are termed as Shakespeare's "lost years" because no evidence has survived to show where he was or why he left Stratford for London. On May 26, 1583, Shakespeare's initially child, Susanna, was baptised at Stratford. Twin kids, a son, Hamnet, along with a daughter, Judith, were baptised on February 2, 1585. Hamnet died in 1596.

London and theatrical career

By 1592 Shakespeare was a playwright in London; he had enough of the standing for Robert Greene to denounce him as "an upstart crow, beautified with our feathers, that with his Tygers hart wrapt in a Players hyde, supposes he is too capable to bombast out a blanke verse as the greatest of you: and being an absolute Johannes factotum, is in his owne conceit the onely Shake-scene in a countrey." (The italicised line parodies the phrase, "Oh, tiger's heart wrapped in a woman's hide" which Shakespeare wrote in Henry VI, piece 3.)

By late 1594 Shakespeare was an actor, author and part-owner of the playing organization, termed as the Lord Chamberlain's Men - the business took its name, like others of the period, from its aristocratic sponsor, in this case the Lord Chamberlain. The group became favored enough that after the death of Elizabeth I and the coronation of James I (1603), the new monarch adopted the firm and it became termed as the King's Men. Shakespeare's composing shows him to indeed be an actor, with various words, words, and references to acting, but there isn't an educational approach to the art of theatre that may be expected.

By 1596 Shakespeare had moved to the parish of St. Helen's, Bishopsgate, and by 1598 he appeared at the best of the list of actors in Every Man in His Humour created by Ben Jonson. Also by 1598 his name started to appear found on the title pages of his plays, presumably as a marketing point.

There is a custom that Shakespeare, in addition to composing various of the plays his organization enacted, and being worried as part-owner of the firm with company and financial details, continued to act in numerous components including the ghost of Hamlet's dad, Adam in ""As You Like It"", and as the Chorus in ""Henry V"".

He appears to have moved across the Thames River to Southwark sometime around 1599. By 1604, he had moved again, north of the river, where he lodged only north of St Paul's Cathedral with a Huguenot family called Mountjoy. His house there is value noting because he helped arrange a wedding between your Mountjoys' daughter and their apprentice Stephen Bellott. Bellott later sued his father-in-law for defaulting on piece of the guaranteed dowry, and Shakespeare was called as a witness.

Various documents recording legal matters and commercial transactions show that Shakespeare grew wealthy enough during his remain in London to purchase a property in Blackfriars, London and own the second-largest home in Stratford, New Place.

Later years

Shakespeare's last 2 plays were created in 1613, after which he appears to have retired to Stratford. He died on April 23 1616, at the age of fifty-two, found on the same date (though not same day for England was nevertheless working under the Julian calendar) as Spanish author and poet Miguel de Cervantes. He equally died on his birthday, if the speculation that he was born on April 23 is correct. He was married to Anne until his death and was survived by his 2 daughters, Susanna and Judith. Susanna wedded Dr John Hall, but there are no direct descendants of the poet and playwright alive now.

Shakespeare is buried in the chancel of Holy Trinity Church in Stratford-upon-Avon. He was granted the honour of burial in the chancel not on account of his fame as a playwright but for buying a share of the tithe of the church for £440 (a considerable sum of funds at the time). A monument placed by his family found on the wall nearest his grave qualities a bust of him posed in the act of composing. Each year on his said birthday, a fresh quill pen is placed in the composing hand of the bust.

He is believed to have created the epitaph on his tombstone:

Great friend, for Jesus' sake forbear,
To dig the dust enclosed here.
Blest become the guy that spares these stones,
But cursed be he that moves my bones. 

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